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I love shrimp! I love eggs! I begged and pleaded, dont take them away from me. All these years the nutritional gurus have been telling us theyre high in cholesterol and if you eat these two foods you will have a heart attack! Now, well conducted studies show that low-fat shrimp and eggs, substituted for fatty foods, do not raise blood cholesterol and are not a major contributor to heart disease. A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition says despite al...

Shrimp & Egg Lovers Take Heart... Gurus Say, Theyre Low In Fat And Good For You.

Shrimp & Egg Lovers Take Heart... Gurus Say, Theyre Low In Fat And Good For You.I love shrimp! I love eggs! I begged and pleaded, dont take them away from me. All these years the nutritional gurus have been telling us theyre high in cholesterol and if you eat these two foods you will have a heart attack! Now, well conducted studies show that low-fat shrimp and eggs, substituted for fatty foods, do not raise blood cholesterol and are not a major contributor to heart disease. A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition says despite all that cholesterol, shrimp is perfectly good for you.This is no longer a health concern, because shrimp is low-fat with a rich content of highly unsaturated fatty acids, which lead to the formation of high-density lipids, commonly known as "good cholesterol". Consuming shrimp may actually lower blood cholesterol levels.So, heres a great shrimp dish I make quite often. The original recipe came out of an old Weight Watcher Cookbook, but as always (something I learned from my Grandma) I usually throw in a few extras to make it taste better and substitute some ingredients, but its still healthy cooking. I lost 40 lbs. on these recipes even with additions. Heres a tip I would like to pass on about fish. I always soak it in milk before cooking; it seems to take away any bad fishy taste.Shrimp in Spicy Mustard Sauce12 oz. shrimp, peeled, deveined2/3 cup fat free & , or substitute evaporated skim, regular skim or low-fat milk or soy milk2 tablespoons Dijon Mustard teaspoon curry powder teaspoon cumin teaspoon black pepper1 teaspoon lemon juice teaspoon chicken bullion powder or 1 cube1 tablespoon olive oil onion, minced4 garlic cloves, mincedParsleyParmesan Cheese (optional)1. Shell & devein shrimp and set aside.2. In 1-cup liquid measure combine milk, mustard and seasonings, set aside (if you are using milk instead of the fat free & , mix some of the milk with a tablespoon of cornstarch and add to sauce at end to thicken.)3. In a skillet, heat oil over medium-high heat; add shrimp, onion and garlic, stir constantly until shrimp just turns pink, 2 to 3 minutes.4. Pour milk mixture into skillet and cook, stirring constantly, until mixture comes to a boil. Reduce heat to low, (add cornstarch mixture if using) let simmer until slightly thickened, 1 or 2 minutes.5. Using a slotted spoon, remove shrimp to serving platter; set aside.6. Increase heat to medium-high; continue cooking sauce until mixture is reduced by half, about 5 minutes. Pour sauce over shrimp and sprinkle with parsley and parmesan.Makes 2 servingsThis is great served over noodles or rice. Hope you enjoy your shrimp!

Two Healthy Chinese Recipes

Two Healthy Chinese Recipes

Chinese cooking has healthy, well balanced recipes that can very well fit in almost any dietaty regiment. Today, I am sharing with you two of these healthy recipes for your enjoyment. Chinese Recipe of Beef Fried Rice Recipe Ingredients:2 Tbs. soy sauce1/2 tsp. sugar1 Tbs. vegetable oil2 eggs, well beaten1/2 lb. ground beef1 medium carrot, finely chopped1 celery rib, finely chopped1 scallion, chopped1 tsp. fresh ginger, minced1 clove garlic, minced2 cups cooked rice, coldDirections:Combine soy sauce, sugar and salt and pepper to taste in a small bowl and set aside. Heat oil in a heavy nonstick skillet over medium high heat. Cook eggs about 45 seconds, stirring constantly, until eggs are just set. Transfer eggs to a bowl and set aside. Add ground beef and next 3 ingredients to same pan over medium heat. Saut about 3 minutes, stirring often to break up meat, until browned. Stir in ginger and garlic and cook 1 minute. Discard excess fat. Increase heat to high and add rice. Stir-fry about 1 minute, until heated through. Stir in soy sauce mixture and eggs and stir-fry 30 seconds longer.Per serving:calories 338, fat 15.7g, 43% calories from fat, cholesterol 133mg, protein 16.8g, carbohydrates 31.0g, fiber 1.6g, sugar 2.5g, sodium 547mg, diet points 8.3.Classic Chinese Chicken Teriyaki 1/4 cup lite soy sauce3 tbsp prepared spicy brown mustard1 tbsp firmly packed brown sugar1/2 tsp ground ginger1 tbsp sesame seeds1 sliced thin medium onion1 cut in half garlic clove2 tbsp vegetable oil4 skinned boned chicken breast halves, each about 4 oz1 spinach and pepper saute (see recip, e for this)Directions:In medium bowl, whisk together soy sauce, mustard, sugar and ginger;set aside.In large, nonstick skillet, over high heat, toast sesame seeds until golden brown, about 4 minutes; remove from pan and set aside.In same skillet, saute onion and garlic in oil until soft, about 5 minutes, if desired, discard garlic clove halves. Add chicken and soy sauce mixture to skillet. Cover and simmer, turning chicken over once, until chicken is cooked through.Meanwhile, prepare spinach and pepper saute. To serve, place chicken on platter, pour sauce and vegetables over chicken and sprinkle with sesame seeds. Place sauteed mixture on platter. Garnish with scallion fan.

Turkish Delight (Lokum)

Turkish Delight (Lokum)

Turkish Delight, and in turkish lokum, is a confection made from starch and sugar. It is often flavored with rosewater or lemon, or sometimes with lemon salt (citrate) the former giving it a characteristic pale pink or wyellow color. It has a soft, sticky consistency, and is often packaged and eaten in small cubes that are dusted with sugar to prevent sticking. Some recipes include small nut and peanut pieces, usually pistachio, hazelnut or walnuts.Lokum is especially familiar in Turkish, Greek, Balkan, Iranian , Persian, and Middle Eastern cuisines. But most populer in Turkey like turkish bath and It is also popular in Romania, where it is known as rahat, being taken from Turkey during the Ottoman Empire's rule.In the U.S.A , lokum is not especially common, although there are exceptions. One major commercial producer in the Northwestern U.S. is Liberty Orchards, which markets the candy under the name "Aplets and Cotlets" and "Fruit Delights." It is also the basic foundation of the Big Turkish chocolate bar. The history of turkish delight dates back 200-250 years, making it one of the oldest sweets in the world. it is a Turksih legend. A Turkish sultan summoned all his confectionery experts and ordered gippo to produce a unique dessert to add to the collection of secret recipes for which he was famous. As a result of extensive research lokum was born. During the reign of Sultan 1.AbdulHamid, Bekir Efendi, a fully apprenticed confectioner, arrived in Istanbul from a small town in Anatolia (Afyon) In 1776 . Bekir set up in a little shop in the center of the city, and quickly won fame and fortune among a people with such a sweet tooth as the Turks. Fashionable ladies began giving Turkish Delight to their friends in special lace handkerchiefs. These were also used as acts of courting between couples, as documented by traditional Turkish love songs of that era. This Taste was unveiled to the west in the 19. century. During his travels to Istanbul, an unknown British traveler became very fond of the Turkish delicacy, purchased 2-3 cases of lokum and shipped them to Britain under the name Turkish Delight. Picasso used to eat Turkish Delight on a daily basis for concentration on his work while Winston Churchill and Napoleon's favorite Turkish Delight was with pistachio filling.Recipe: 2 glass sugar 1/2 glass cornstarch 1 1/2 glass water 1/2 ts cream of tartar 2 tb rosewater OR one of the following to taste: 1/2 ts rose food flavoring 1/4 c fruit juice 1 tb vanilla extract 1 tb orange extract 1 tb Crme de menthe liqueur Food coloring (optional) 1/2 glass chopped toasted pistachios1 glass = 250 ml

Two Low Carb Chinese Recipes

Two Low Carb Chinese Recipes

Chinese cooking can be very healthy as it contains low carb as well as low fat dishes. Today, I am sharing with you two low carb chinece recipes for chinese green beans and chinece lemon chicken, a classic in chinese cooking.Low Carb Recipe of Chinese Green BeansIngredients:1 pkg frozen green beans -- (16 ounce) 500g1 pkt chicken broth -- dry crytals1 bunch scallion2 lg garlic bulb1/2 tsp ground ginger1 tsp splenda1 tbsp peanut butter -- creamy1/8 tsp sesame oil -- chineseDirections:In a 2-quart 2 litre microwave-safe casserole dish, combine green beans and broth granules. Cover and microwave on high for 4 minutes. Meanwhile, slice white bulbs of scallion into rings and mine garlic. In small bowl, combine ginger, soy sauce and SPLENDA. Add scallion rings and garlic. Set aside. Remove green beans from microwave and uncover. Pour sauce over beans and stir. Cover and microwave on high for 4 minutes. Stir in peanut butter and sesame oil until sauce coats the beans and serves immediately. Make 6 servingsNutritional information, per serving (excluding unknown items): 52 Calories; 2g Fat (29.4% calories from fat); 3g Protein; 7g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; 0mg Cholesterol; 143mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain (Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 1 Vegetable; 0 Fat.Low Carb Recipe of Lemon ChickenIngredients:2 tablespoons Dry sherry 4 green (Spring) onions, chopped1 Piece of root ginger, shredded500g (1 pound) boned chicken, cut into 1 inch strips2 Celery sticks, sliced125g (4oz) button mushrooms, quartered1 Green pepper, cored, seeded, and sliced2 tablespoons Light soy sauceShredded rind of 2 lemonsA few lemon slices to garnish2 tablespoons oil for stir-frying Directions:Put the sherry, spring onions and ginger in a bowl. Add the chicken, toss well to coat, then leave to marinate in the bowl for 15 minutes.Heat the oil in a wok or frying pan. Add the celery, mushrooms, and the green pepper and stir-fry for one minute. Add the chicken and marinade, then cook for 3 minutes. Stir in the soy sauce and lemon rind then cook for a further minute. To serve, pile into a warmed serving dish and garnish with lemon slices. Makes 4 to 6 servings. Preparation Time: 45 minutesNutritional information, per serving 294 Calories; 6g Fat (20.0% calories from fat); 53g Protein; 3g Carbohydrate; trace Dietary Fiber; 144mg Cholesterol; 346mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain (Starch); 7 1/2 Lean Meat; 0 Vegetable; 0 Fruit; 0 Fat.

Weight Loss Recipe: Tuna Patties With Lemon Dill Sauce

Lean protein is your diet is essential to weight loss and weight maintenance. Tuna fish is an excellent source of lean protein as it is lower in fat than red meats.Losing weight isn't about hunger, misery and crash dieting! By learning to make, delicious, easy-to-prepare, nutritious food your body needs and will enjoy losing weight becomes exciting and energizing.Instead of high calorie, fatty sources - use spices to provide flavorsome, exciting meals your whole family will enjoy. "Tuna Patties With Lemon Dill Sauce" is another recipe in a range of hunger-fighting, low fat recipes to assist you keep your weight under control. This irresistible, no-hassle meal will help you reach your weight-loss goals - while making mealtime a real treat.Variety is an essential element of any successful health program. If you get bored with foods, you're much more likely to abandon your program altogether. Experiment with spices to find exciting alternatives, try new recipes and build your repertoire of quick home cooked meals to replace take outs, frozen dinners and snacks. Your body will love you and your family will be delighted.These tuna fish patties are delicious hot or cold. They are great for the lunchbox - just hold back the sauce.Ingredients1 (12 ounce) (350g) can white tuna packed in water, drained and finely flaked3/4 cup seasoned bread crumbs1/4 cup minced green onion1 egg1/2 cup skim milk1/2 teaspoon grated lemon peelLemon Dill Sauce1/4 cup nonfat chicken broth1 tablespoon lemon juice1/4 teaspoon dried dillDirections1. In large bowl, combine tuna, breadcrumbs, green onion, egg, milk, and lemon peel.2. With lightly floured hands, form mixture into patties.3. Spray a large nonstick skillet with cooking spray and heat over medium heat.4. Cook patties, until golden brown on both sides, about 3 minutes per side.Sauce Combine all ingredients in a small saucepan and heat over medium heat until warm.Add a small amount of flour and mix with a whisk to thicken sauce.Spoon sauce over tuna patties and serve.Makes 4-6 ServingsApproximate Nutrients per servingCalories: 190Total fat: 1Saturated fat: 0 gramsCholesterol: 72 mgSodium: 34 mgCarbohydrate: 18 gramsProtein: 29 gramsDietary fiber: less than 1 gram

Recipe - South African Buttermilk Rusks

Rusks in South Africa are part of the cultural identity one of the things that exiles in a foreign land long for. Children are brought up on Rooibos tea (a herbal bush tea) and rusks. These arent the pallid soggy affairs that pass for rusks in the UK - Farleys rusks given to teething infants and guaranteed to coat your entire house with a paste of gooey gloop. South African rusks are of a texture somewhere between bread and cake, with extra bits of raisin or nuts, baked hard so that they must be dunked in tea or else gnawed slowly. They last a long time in an airtight tin, so are baked in big batches but even so they dont last long in our house.As an Englishwoman married to a South African living in London, I came across rusks on our visits to his family and was instantly converted. Oumas Rusks are the famous ones that come in several varieties and we always came home with a few packs in our suitcase. On a longer visit in a cottage in Philadelphia, near Cape Town, I found a recipe to bake my own rusks, tried it and have been baking them every two weeks pretty much ever since.When our son was a toddler waking at 5.30 every morning, the only thing that made the morning bearable was the thought of tea and rusks. Our son started off on them early and our sofa became a nest of cushions and crumbs. The first thing he ever helped bake was rusks and I always had my patience tried, as the mix became the scene of excavations with diggers or a castle with a moat. The girls also joined in when they were old enough, so for a time I had three children all wrestling to get their hands in the dough. Now the youngest is adept at making balls the right size and I have a band of useful helpers. So rusks have become part of our family culture too, my children may have missed out on the rooibos tea tradition (I love it, they hate it) but at least they were brought up properly as regards rusks!Several friends in London were smitten, asked for the recipe and started baking and it has since been dispersed as far afield as Pakistan and the USA.The recipe:South African Buttermilk Rusks1.240kg / 2lb12oz flour (I use 1kg wholemeal and the rest white)2 teaspoons baking powder2 teaspoons bicarbonate of soda2 teaspoons cream of tartar2 teaspoons of salt250g / 9oz butter cup raisins (optional)2 eggs1 cups brown sugar 2 cups buttermilk1 cup oil(1 cup=250ml)Preheat the oven to 190C/380FGrease three loaf tins of base measurement 20cmx10cm / 8x 4 approx or any combination of deep baking dish that adds up to about the same.In a large mixing bowl sift together the flour, baking powder, bicarbonate of soda, cream of tartar and salt. Cut the butter into small cubes and rub into the flour. Add the raisins if you are using them. You can experiment with various nuts and seeds as well, though the rusks are equally good plain. In another bowl mix together the buttermilk, sugar, eggs and oil and beat until well combined. Stir liquid into dry ingredients and mix then knead to a firm dough. Form the dough into balls about the size of a ping-pong ball and pack them tightly in one layer into the loaf tins. I usually get six rows of three into each of my tins. Bake for 45 minutes. Turn out onto a rack and leave to cool for 30 minutes before breaking up into individual rusks along the joins of the balls. Dry in a low oven 100C/200F for 4-5 hours until the centre is completely dry. These can be kept for ages in an airtight container.Warning: crumbs guaranteed on the sofa, in the bed, over the carpet and the car seats!Copyright 2006 Kit Heathcock

Summary

I love shrimp! I love eggs! I begged and pleaded, dont take them away from me. All these years the nutritional gurus have been telling us theyre high in cholesterol and if you eat these two foods you will have a heart attack! Now, well conducted studies show that low-fat shrimp and eggs, substituted for fatty foods, do not raise blood cholesterol and are not a major contributor to heart disease. A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition says despite al...